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Word Nerd: Elsie

How did Elsie get its name?

By RYAN HUME

Published on March 2, 2017 8:00AM

The annual Camp 18 Logger’s Memorial Dedication and Logging Exhibition features an array of competitive events for students, from spur climbing, to double bucking, sawing and axe-throwing.

Photo by Katherine Lacaze

The annual Camp 18 Logger’s Memorial Dedication and Logging Exhibition features an array of competitive events for students, from spur climbing, to double bucking, sawing and axe-throwing.

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A paean to local timber, Camp 18’s exterior features carvings of wildlife and people.

File photo

A paean to local timber, Camp 18’s exterior features carvings of wildlife and people.

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The Elderberry Inn, along with Baker’s General Store, are the hub of Elsie.

Submitted Photo

The Elderberry Inn, along with Baker’s General Store, are the hub of Elsie.


Elsie [ɛl•si]

noun

1. an unincorporated community in Clatsop County. Located on the mountainous terrain of the Northern Oregon Coast Range, Elsie sits near where the junction of U.S. Highway 26 and Oregon Route 103 crosses the Nehalem River as well as the confluence of West and East Humbug Creeks. Elsie is probably best known to travelers of U.S. Highway 26 for being the home of the restaurant and logging museum Camp 18, Sunset Coffee, Baker’s General Store and the Elderberry Inn

Origin:

Elsie is named in honor of Elsie Foster, a relative of George Gragg, who was the first postmaster, having established the Elsie Post Office in 1892. The post office closed in 1943. Gragg apparently wanted to originally name the community Clover, but the name was rejected and he settled on honoring his niece instead.

Elsie is a British diminutive variant of the name Elizabeth, which arrives from the Greek version of the Hebrew name, אֱלִישֶׁבַע, or Elisheva, which roughly translates to “oath of God.”

“Elsie, like so much on the Oregon Coast, is endangered. Lying on the edge of urban sprawl from Portland and gaining favor with those priced out of Cannon Beach, the green hills of Elsie may soon be more than a pass-through and secret sanctuary.”

—R.J. Marx, “More than a pass-through, Elsie is at crossroads,” Seaside Signal, Aug. 7, 2015, P. 4A

“Expect to see lots of cool wood carvings throughout the Camp 18 facilities. The eye-catching marvel is a definite place to stop while driving Highway 26 in the Pacific Northwest. If you are visiting local communities like Seaside, Astoria, Cannon Beach, Nehalem, Wheeler or Portland, it’s a short and beautiful drive to Elsie!”

—Camp 18 Restaurant website, camp18restaurant.com





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