The Arts: A visit to this gallery is bound to make an imprint

Imprint Gallery offers quirky statues, contemplative paintings and printmaking possibilities

By Nancy McCarthy

For Coast Weekend

Published on April 13, 2017 12:01AM

Last changed on April 14, 2017 10:00AM

British artist Jane Andrews studies character, identity and survival skills in her own life through her surreal paintings.

Nancy McCarthy photo

British artist Jane Andrews studies character, identity and survival skills in her own life through her surreal paintings.

A life-sized jack rabbit was created by Yvonne Herbst with needle-felted wool over a wire sculpture.

Nancy McCarthy photo

A life-sized jack rabbit was created by Yvonne Herbst with needle-felted wool over a wire sculpture.

James Tisdale, of Austin, Texas, created this sculpture, which greets visitors at the Imprint Gallery.

Nancy McCarthy photo

James Tisdale, of Austin, Texas, created this sculpture, which greets visitors at the Imprint Gallery.

Small ceramic shot cups by Erik Haagensen feature whimsical figurines designed to draw smiles.

Nancy McCarthy photo

Small ceramic shot cups by Erik Haagensen feature whimsical figurines designed to draw smiles.

Mike and Jane Brumfield recently opened the Imprint Gallery, 183 N. Hemlock St., in the space that formerly housed the Haystack Gallery.

Nancy McCarthy photo

Mike and Jane Brumfield recently opened the Imprint Gallery, 183 N. Hemlock St., in the space that formerly housed the Haystack Gallery.

As part of her Mardi Gras Continuum series, Heidi Preuss Grew created this stoneware and porcelain sculpture, titled “Riding Lieutenant,” following a trip to New Orleans.

Nancy McCarthy photo

As part of her Mardi Gras Continuum series, Heidi Preuss Grew created this stoneware and porcelain sculpture, titled “Riding Lieutenant,” following a trip to New Orleans.

Imprint studio manager Alisa Vernon instructs a group in the techniques of printmaking. Hourlong printmaking demonstrations are planned on weekends from April through August and longer workshops are set for fall.

Submitted Photo

Imprint studio manager Alisa Vernon instructs a group in the techniques of printmaking. Hourlong printmaking demonstrations are planned on weekends from April through August and longer workshops are set for fall.


CANNON BEACH — At Imprint Gallery, there aren’t any paintings of radiant sunsets or majestic coastal forests. It’s not a gallery focused on ocean scenery and a beachgoer’s lifestyle.

Instead, the gallery features quirky sculptures that draw smiles from observers, paintings that cause contemplation and mugs and bowls that prompt playfulness.

Upstairs, visitors can try their own hand at art in the printmaking studio where weekend drop-in demonstrations are planned in the spring, summer and longer fall workshops will be held.

Owners Mike and Jane Brumfield have taken their experience as operators of previous galleries in England and Boise, Idaho, and applied it to their new gallery at 183 N. Hemlock St., in the former site of Haystack Gallery, which closed last year after more than 30 years.

“We have people who were Haystack shoppers who will walk into the back room to see a piece they saw before and suddenly realize this isn’t Haystack Gallery anymore,” said Mike.

After she left as director of the Cannon Beach Gallery last fall, Jane wasn’t sure what her next step would be. Then, at just about the time Mike told her he wanted to end his retirement and open a new gallery, the Haystack space became available. “It was a little serendipitous,” Mike said.

For the past few months, until the gallery opened April 1, “we’ve been in a blur,” he added.

They contacted artists whose work they enjoy and with whom they had built relationships from their previous galleries. The artists come from Britain, Texas, Georgia, Virginia and Illinois, and more are being added, including several from the Northwest.

Their interest is in mixed media, sculptures and ceramics, said Jane, who, as a teenager, organized art shows in her local church hall in England, where she grew up. She studied sculpture in college but decided she enjoyed curating other artists’ work better than being an artist herself.

“We do have eclectic tastes,” said Jane. “They are more than decorative items or landscapes.”

The pieces they are showing include the dreamlike wire and ceramic human-animal hybrid sculptures that Virginia artist Aggie Zed calls “scrap floats.” The lifelike felt jack rabbit and birds created by former Pixar illustrator Yvonne Herbst are craft turned into art.

Angelia Purviance, of Corvallis, explores the stages of childhood through her full-color intaglio prints, a copper-plate-etching process. The paintings of Portlander Mark Andres reflect the initial feelings he experiences when he goes to a place for the first time. A darker side of life is captured in the surreal paintings depicting character, identity and survival strategies by British artist Jane Andrews.

For those who enjoy a little humor to accompany their snacks, the ceramic cups, bowls and shot glasses by Erik Haagensen, adorned with bicycling porcupines, drummer lions and other whimsical figurines will do the job.

Upstairs at the gallery are more etchings and prints, both framed and unframed.

In addition to the print displays is a printmaking studio where drop-in linocut printmaking demonstrations will be offered at 1, 2:15 and 3:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays from April through August. Participants will try the tools and produce an artwork with the guidance of studio manager Alisa Vernon. Cost for the hourlong sessions is $15.

Drop-in drypoint printmaking demonstrations also will be available on Fridays in July and August, and longer workshops are set for fall.

“We have never done anything educational before in any of our galleries,” Jane said. “The demonstrations are for someone who has never done printmaking or some who’s done printmaking, but not that technique.”

The Imprint Gallery has joined Cannon Beach’s Gallery Group and looks forward to participating in the group’s events, including the upcoming Spring Unveiling.

Having so many galleries in one town is a benefit, Mike said, especially when the galleries feature different artists.

“We don’t look at it as competition,” he said. “When galleries are concentrated in an area, they thrive on each other.”

The other gallery owners have welcomed them, Jane added.

“We appreciate their encouragement and support,” she said.













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