Home Coast Dining

Alimento: Two weeks of nourishment

One writer chronicles his cooking with Andrew Catalano’s meal kits

By Ryan Hume

For Coast Weekend

Published on September 14, 2017 3:04PM

Last changed on September 14, 2017 3:48PM

Bucatini Pasta with House Bacon, English Peas and Salt-cured Egg. Total prep time: 25 mins

Photo by Ryan Hume

Bucatini Pasta with House Bacon, English Peas and Salt-cured Egg. Total prep time: 25 mins

Roast Chicken with Tomato and Peach Panzanella. Total prep time: 35 mins

Photo by Ryan Hume

Roast Chicken with Tomato and Peach Panzanella. Total prep time: 35 mins

Seared Rockfish with Warm Summer Sauté. Total prep time: 20 mins

Photo by Ryan Hume

Seared Rockfish with Warm Summer Sauté. Total prep time: 20 mins

Roast Chicken with Purple Filet Beans and Heirloom Tomatoes. Total prep time: 35 mins

Photo by Ryan Hume

Roast Chicken with Purple Filet Beans and Heirloom Tomatoes. Total prep time: 35 mins

Glazed Japanese Eggplant with Tokyo Turnips, Baby Bok Choy and Steamed Rice. Total prep time: 30 min

Photo by Ryan Hume

Glazed Japanese Eggplant with Tokyo Turnips, Baby Bok Choy and Steamed Rice. Total prep time: 30 min

Smoked Pork Sandwiches with Kohlrabi Slaw. Total prep time: 20 mins

Photo by Ryan Hume

Smoked Pork Sandwiches with Kohlrabi Slaw. Total prep time: 20 mins


Coast Weekend took the opportunity to try two weeks of Alimento’s meal kit service at the end of summer, when the North Coast is bursting with tomatoes, peppers and legumes.

Chef Andrew Catalano, Alimento’s owner, lists the recipes in the order in which he hopes the dishes will be cooked, which we followed to a tee.

Pick up or delivery is available every Friday afternoon.


Alimento Kit for Aug. 25, 2017


• Seared Rockfish with Warm Summer Sauté

The rockfish is so fresh it only hinted at the faint brine of the sea. Corn, two types of peppers, potatoes, cherry tomatoes, tarragon and onion quickly formed into a spicy bed for the fish. Crisp, juicy and quintessentially summer.

Total prep time: 20 mins

• Roast Chicken with Tomato and Peach Panzanella

Bone-in chicken thighs browned up nicely in cast iron with the skin side down. A quick toast on the sourdough let the bread hold its own in a salad of juicy tomatoes and peaches.

Total time: 35 mins

• Smoked Pork Sandwiches with Kohlrabi Slaw

Smoked pulled pork is quickly reinvigorated in a pan with a shot of vinegar and a spice rub of smoked paprika and sugar. Paired with a crunchy slaw of kohlrabi and purple cabbage, the artisan sandwich bun was more than up to the task and holding all of this together. After a quick grate, zucchini batter for fritters came together in just three moves.

Total prep time: 20 mins


Alimento Kit for Sept. 1, 2017


• Glazed Japanese Eggplant with Tokyo Turnips, Baby Bok Choy and Steamed Rice

With rice in the pot, the vegetables sizzle in the pan. A pour of pre-measured sauce (tamari, mirin, and honey) melts onto the vegetables and gives them a heavy dose of sweetness and umami. Large, round flavors.

Total prep time: 30 mins

• Roast Chicken with Purple Filet Beans and Heirloom Tomatoes

A bed of farro is enlivened with minced rosemary. The stewed tomatoes and beans add a heartiness to this dish that seems like it should take longer to accomplish than just ten minutes in a pot.

Total prep time: 35 mins

• Bucatini Pasta with House Bacon, English Peas, and Salt-cured Egg

You can’t find bacon like this in the store: perfectly marbled yet solid; cut as thick as a ham steak. Fresh peas add color and wonderful pop next to the toothy bucatini (think hollow spaghetti). Generous gratings of hard cheese and salt-cured egg melt into a velvety sauce to finish this expert play on a classic carbonara. A side of broccolini with crushed hazelnuts provides a contrast of crunch.

Total prep time: 25 mins


Pairings for Alimento


Chef Catalano hopes to create some limited-seating dinners pairing his local cuisine with our many local breweries and regional wines. Here are some recommendations to accompany his recent meal kit menus.

• Seared Rockfish with Warm Summer Sauté

“Almost any of a number of beers from Pfriem (Hood River). These beers are always true to style but with a common ‘Pfrieminess’ — slight citrus-y bitterness, whiff of Brett, high acid drinkability. Light-bodied but plenty of character to match a light but flavorful summer meal. Also, a Riesling.”

• Roast chicken with Tomato and Peach Panzanella

“This one is pretty versatile, but my best bets would be: an Oregon chard (I love Ian’s Chardonnay from Chehalem Winery in Newberg). It’s got enough body and richness to suggest white Burgundy (and to match well with the peaches), but the long, cool growing season of the Willamette Valley gives it a freshness and zing. Also, a Riesling, again, is just a perfect fit for peaches. I really like the Brooks line-up, available at the Co-op.”

• Smoked Pork Sandwiches with Kohlrabi Slaw

“Buoy helles, no question.”

• Glazed Japanese Eggplant with Tokyo Turnips, Baby Bok Choy and Steamed Rice

“A Bota Box Pinot Grigio, which is available from the Co-op, is simple but delicious, with enough creaminess in the mid-palate to carry the glaze, but a light freshness that won’t get in the way of the lightly-cooked veggies. Also an IPA almost always makes sense with a slightly spicy stir-fry, and I suggest looking no further than the IPA king of Astoria, Fort George.”

• Roast Chicken with Purple Filet Beans and Heirloom Tomatoes

“This time of year: rosé, rosé, rosé. There are some great inexpensive ones available at the Co-op, and you can’t go wrong with any of them. This is a summer dish with some depth, and rosé gives you both the lightness to balance the umami-rich cooked tomatoes and just the plain delicious factor that you need when you’re sipping and eating on the porch.”

• Bucatini Pasta with House Bacon, English Peas and Salt-cured Egg

“One of the wonderful saisons from Reach Break will cut through the fat and smoke of the bacon but won’t overwhelm the freshness of the peas. The fresh acidity will balance the creaminess of the salt-cured egg. A delicious cider from the new Reveille would work equally well and for the same reasons. For something different, a red from Syncline (near Hood River and available at the Co-op) will echo the flavors of pork fat and smoke with a tannic backbone that will be tempered by the cheese and bacon.”





Marketplace

Share and Discuss

Guidelines

User Comments