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Watershed Council examines influences on sedimentation

OSU professor gives lecture in Manzanita on Nov. 9

Published on November 2, 2017 12:01AM

From left: Sean Mahaffey (Oregon Sate University), Narayan Elasmar (Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce) and Grace Molino (Brown University) work to extract a 3-meter-long core from a Nehalem Bay marsh in June 2016.

L. Brophy Photo

From left: Sean Mahaffey (Oregon Sate University), Narayan Elasmar (Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce) and Grace Molino (Brown University) work to extract a 3-meter-long core from a Nehalem Bay marsh in June 2016.


MANZANITA — The Lower Nehalem Watershed Council will welcome Rob Wheatcroft, of Oregon State University, for the next installation of the Speaker Series 7:20 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 9, at the Pine Grove Community House (225 Laneda Ave.) in Manzanita.

The presentation will follow an update from the Watershed Council at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Wheatcroft will examine how natural processes — such as variations in river flow and coastal uplift, as well as human-related processes, such as timber harvesting and land reclamation — combine to influence the supply and accumulation of sediment and organic carbon in Oregon estuaries. The Nehalem River system will be featured, but lessons learned from other dispersal systems in the Pacific Northwest will be used to provide context.

In his research, Wheatcroft, a professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, focuses on the transport and accumulation of sediment and organic carbon across the land-ocean boundary from event to millennial time scales.

This interest has led him and his students to study small, mountainous river systems in the Apennines, Pyrenees, California and the Pacific Northwest. He is leading a team funded by Oregon Sea Grant to better understand the competing roles of relative sea-level rise and river sediment supply in the accumulation of sediment and carbon in Oregon estuaries over the last 300 years.

Find more information on the speaker series on the Watershed Council’s Facebook page (facebook.com/lnwc1).



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