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Photography exhibition follows the Columbia River from its source to the sea

View exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland

Published on January 18, 2017 12:00PM

Wildflowers glow during last light on Dog Mountain above the Columbia River Gorge.

Submitted photo

Wildflowers glow during last light on Dog Mountain above the Columbia River Gorge.

Photographer Peter Marbach straddles the headwaters of the Columbia River in British Columbia, Canada.

Submitted photo

Photographer Peter Marbach straddles the headwaters of the Columbia River in British Columbia, Canada.

A friendship dance at National Aboriginal Day in Windermer, British Columbia.

Submitted photo

A friendship dance at National Aboriginal Day in Windermer, British Columbia.


PORTLAND — The Columbia River flows for over 1,200 miles, born free in the cradle of the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia. From its humble beginnings from a tiny spring you can straddle, to a 2-mile wide confluence with the Pacific Ocean, the river flowed for thousands of years in a natural state of astounding beauty. It was also the place of a miraculous ancient migration of Pacific salmon that came all the way home to the headwaters in Canada.

In his new original exhibition, “The Columbia River: From Source to Sea,” Oregon photographer Peter Marbach shares his decade-long odyssey to document the sacred landscapes and the people of the entire river. The exhibition opened Jan. 13 at the Oregon Historical Society and is on view through April 1.

“It was a challenge to sort through all the work I have created for this exhibit,” Marbach said. “It is a vast, diverse river with so many distinct features and people who have inspired me with their stories. Ultimately, it came down to which images best represented the essence of the project and help illuminate the larger story of preserving this great river and taking steps toward restoring ancient salmons runs.”

One striking image featured in the show is a self-portrait of the artist. “In December 2015, I drove the 15 hours to the headwaters region in search of the true source of the river,” said Marbach. “It was bitter cold, but I was determined to stay until finding it. I trudged through a mile of frozen marsh following a creek that was continually narrowing until I found the spot where the water bubbles up from an underground spring. I was overjoyed to stand there and straddle the headwaters! But it took two hours to create a self- portrait, waiting for a brief moment of sunlight to illuminate the moment of discovery.”

The exhibit will include a blend of riverscapes, wildlife and portraits of people who live along the Columbia, showcasing the beauty, culture and geographic diversity of Nch I Wana — The Big River.

“Having lived along the Columbia for more than 20 years, I have a deep respect and connection to this sacred river,” said Marbach. “This project only enhanced that connection, especially getting to know the wild and free section of the Columbia in British Columbia. Cradled between the Rocky Mountains and the Purcell Range, the unspeakable beauty fired my imagination to wonder what it must have been like before the era of dams when fish used to migrate all the way, some 1,200 miles from the Pacific to the headwaters.”

The Oregon Historical Society’s museum, located at 1200 S.W. Park Ave. in Portland, is open seven days a week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents thanks to the renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy.





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